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Install Webmin

Real quick – Webmin on Ubuntu 7.10.

Get Dependencies:

sudo apt-get install perl libnet-ssleay-perl openssl libauthen-pam-perl libpam-runtime libio-pty-perl libmd5-perl

Download:

sudo wget http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/webadmin/webmin_1.380_all.deb

(or whatever version is latest – browse to the webmin site, and paste the link for the current version download)

Install:

sudo dpkg -i webmin_1.380_all.deb

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I was installing Evolution to my laptop recently (see article on Evolution, the best Outlook replacement).  After firing up Evolution, I didn’t have the option for Exchange.  I found that the Exchange connector is listed as a suggested package, so my command of “apt-get install evolution” only retrieved the basics.

I’ve seen this problem before: I want to install the full application with the features I need, but some of the packages are listed as suggested or recommended.  If using the GUI package manager (Synaptic or Adept) it is easy enough to click them – but it is a pain to type them all in on a terminal.

That is where Wajig comes in:

First, install it:

  sudo apt-get install wajig

Now, you can use it in place of apt-get to select recommended and/or suggested packages.  For example, I want to install Evolution, so I have 4 options:

sudo apt-get install evolution
– This installs Evolution alone

sudo wajig installr evolution
– This installs Evolution with recommended packages (see the “r”)

sudo wajig installs evolution
– This installs Evolution with suggested packages (see the “s”)

sudo wajig installrs evolution
– This installs Evolution with recommended and suggested packages (see the “rs”)

Way cool…

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I found this sample file on the net, so I thought I’d post it here.  There are some excellent and complexconfig examples here:
It has a few good examples of configurations for your interfaces file.    See Also: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/setting-up-an-network-interfaces-file/ #/etc/network/interfaces — configuration file for ifup(8), ifdown(8)
#
# A “#” character in the very first column makes the rest of the line
# be ignored. Blank lines are ignored. Lines may be indented freely.
# A “\” character at the very end of the line indicates the next line
# should be treated as a continuation of the current one.
#
# The “pre-up”, “up”, “down” and “post-down” options are valid for all
# interfaces, and may be specified multiple times. All other options
# may only be specified once.
#
# See the interfaces(5) manpage for information on what options are
# available.
######################################################################

# We always want the loopback interface.
#
# auto lo
# iface lo inet loopback

# An example ethernet card setup: (broadcast and gateway are optional)
#
# auto eth0
# iface eth0 inet static
#     address 192.168.0.42
#     network 192.168.0.0
#     netmask 255.255.255.0
#     broadcast 192.168.0.255
#     gateway 192.168.0.1

# A more complicated ethernet setup, with a less common netmask, and a downright
# weird broadcast address: (the “up” lines are executed verbatim when the
# interface is brought up, the “down” lines when it’s brought down)
#
# auto eth0
# iface eth0 inet static
#     address 192.168.1.42
#     network 192.168.1.0
#     netmask 255.255.255.128
#     broadcast 192.168.1.0
#     up route add -net 192.168.1.128 netmask 255.255.255.128 gw 192.168.1.2
#     up route add default gw 192.168.1.200
#     down route del default gw 192.168.1.200
#     down route del -net 192.168.1.128 netmask 255.255.255.128 gw 192.168.1.2

# A more complicated ethernet setup with a single ethernet card with
# two interfaces.
# Note: This happens to work since ifconfig handles it that way, not because
# ifup/down handles the ‘:’ any differently.
# Warning: There is a known bug if you do this, since the state will not
# be properly defined if you try to ‘ifdown eth0’ when both interfaces
# are up. The ifconfig program will not remove eth0 but it will be
# removed from the interfaces state so you will see it up until you execute:
# ‘ifdown eth0:1 ; ifup eth0; ifdown eth0’
# BTW, this is “bug” #193679 (it’s not really a bug, it’s more of a
# limitation)
#
# auto eth0 eth0:1
# iface eth0 inet static
#     address 192.168.0.100
#     network 192.168.0.0
#     netmask 255.255.255.0
#     broadcast 192.168.0.255
#     gateway 192.168.0.1
# iface eth0:1 inet static
#     address 192.168.0.200
#     network 192.168.0.0
#     netmask 255.255.255.0

# “pre-up” and “post-down” commands are also available. In addition, the
# exit status of these commands are checked, and if any fail, configuration
# (or deconfiguration) is aborted. So:
#
# auto eth0
# iface eth0 inet dhcp
#     pre-up [ -f /etc/network/local-network-ok ]
#
# will allow you to only have eth0 brought up when the file
# /etc/network/local-network-ok exists.

# Two ethernet interfaces, one connected to a trusted LAN, the other to
# the untrusted Internet. If their MAC addresses get swapped (because an
# updated kernel uses a different order when probing for network cards,
# say), then they don’t get brought up at all.
#
# auto eth0 eth1
# iface eth0 inet static
#     address 192.168.42.1
#     netmask 255.255.255.0
#     pre-up /path/to/check-mac-address.sh eth0 11:22:33:44:55:66
#     pre-up /usr/local/sbin/enable-masq
# iface eth1 inet dhcp
#     pre-up /path/to/check-mac-address.sh eth1 AA:BB:CC:DD:EE:FF
#     pre-up /usr/local/sbin/firewall

# Two ethernet interfaces, one connected to a trusted LAN, the other to
# the untrusted Internet, identified by MAC address rather than interface
# name:
#
# auto eth0 eth1
# mapping eth0 eth1
#     script /path/to/get-mac-address.sh
#     map 11:22:33:44:55:66 lan
#     map AA:BB:CC:DD:EE:FF internet
# iface lan inet static
#     address 192.168.42.1
#     netmask 255.255.255.0
#     pre-up /usr/local/sbin/enable-masq $IFACE
# iface internet inet dhcp
#     pre-up /usr/local/sbin/firewall $IFACE

# A PCMCIA interface for a laptop that is used in different locations:
# (note the lack of an “auto” line for any of these)
#
# mapping eth0
#    script /path/to/pcmcia-compat.sh
#    map home,*,*,*                  home
#    map work,*,*,00:11:22:33:44:55  work-wireless
#    map work,*,*,01:12:23:34:45:50  work-static
#
# iface home inet dhcp
# iface work-wireless bootp
# iface work-static static
#     address 10.15.43.23
#     netmask 255.255.255.0
#     gateway 10.15.43.1
#
# Note, this won’t work unless you specifically change the file
# /etc/pcmcia/network to look more like:
#
#     if [ -r ./shared ] ; then . ./shared ; else . /etc/pcmcia/shared ; fi
#     get_info $DEVICE
#     case “$ACTION” in
#         ‘start’)
#             /sbin/ifup $DEVICE
#             ;;
#         ‘stop’)
#             /sbin/ifdown $DEVICE
#             ;;
#     esac
#     exit 0

# An alternate way of doing the same thing: (in this case identifying
# where the laptop is is done by configuring the interface as various
# options, and seeing if a computer that is known to be on each particular
# network will respond to pings. The various numbers here need to be chosen
# with a great deal of care.)
#
# mapping eth0
#    script /path/to/ping-places.sh
#    map 192.168.42.254/24 192.168.42.1 home
#    map 10.15.43.254/24 10.15.43.1 work-wireless
#    map 10.15.43.23/24 10.15.43.1 work-static
#
# iface home inet dhcp
# iface work-wireless bootp
# iface work-static static
#     address 10.15.43.23
#     netmask 255.255.255.0
#     gateway 10.15.43.1
#
# Note that the ping-places script requires the iproute package installed,
# and the same changes to /etc/pcmcia/network are required for this as for
# the previous example.

# Set up an interface to read all the traffic on the network. This
# configuration can be useful to setup Network Intrusion Detection
# sensors in ‘stealth’-type configuration. This prevents the NIDS
# system to be a direct target in a hostile network since they have
# no IP address on the network. Notice, however, that there have been
# known bugs over time in sensors part of NIDS (for example see
# DSA-297 related to Snort) and remote buffer overflows might even be
# triggered by network packet processing.
#
# auto eth0
# iface eth0 inet manual
#     up ifconfig $IFACE 0.0.0.0 up
#       up ip link set $IFACE promisc on
#       down ip link set $IFACE promisc off
#       down ifconfig $IFACE down

# Set up an interface which will not be allocated an IP address by
# ifupdown but will be configured through external programs. This
# can be useful to setup interfaces configured through other programs,
# like, for example, PPPOE scripts.
#
# auto eth0
# iface eth0 inet manual
#       up ifconfig $IFACE 0.0.0.0 up
#       up /usr/local/bin/myconfigscript
#       down ifconfig $IFACE down

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3D Effects in Ubuntu

On my system with nVidia card, I did the following to enable 3D effects (and later, dual display with 3D effects, which is really cool).

From Terminal:

gksudo nvidia-settings

sudo apt-get install compizconfig-settings-manager

This will install the Advanced Desktop Effects option under System-Preferences

System-Preferences-Appearance-Visual Effects-Extra

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Next, I want to make sure I can play MP3s, DVDs, etc. You should first check with your local laws to make sure this is legal. I am not sure why that is listed on every site that says anything to do with MP3s and DVDs, but there it is, the disclaimer. You have been warned.

UPDATE:
Apparently, there is a new way to enable some of these items, right within Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy):

  • Go to ApplicationsAdd/Remove…
  • Set Show: to All available applications
  • Search for ubuntu-restricted-extras and install it. Note that there is also xubuntu-restricted-extras and kubuntu-restricted-extras.


NOTE: I still found the old way added some useful items. Those are listed below:

In Terminal (Applications, Terminal)
(note: most commands are run from Terminal, I am not going to tell you to use it every time)
– sudo wget http://www.medibuntu.org/sources.list.d/gutsy.list -O /etc/apt/sources.list.d/medibuntu.list
– wget -q http://packages.medibuntu.org/medibuntu-key.gpg -O- | sudo apt-key add – && sudo apt-get update

Install apps:
Free apps from Medibuntu (as of Sept 2007)
– sudo apt-get install amarok ffmpeg k3b kaffeine libdvdcss2 mplayer xmms-wma

(note: errors on: bmp-wma (would not install properly from Medibuntu))

Non-free apps from Medibuntu (as of Sept 2007)
– sudo apt-get install acroread googleearth skype w32codecs flashplugin-nonfree
(note: errors on: ibm-j2re1.5 ibm-j2sdk1.5 ppc-codecs skype-static (would not install properly from Medibuntu))

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